People

LISO Faculty, Visiting Scholars & Alumni

Below is a list of the LISO faculty and their areas of interest and specializations. Click on names of faculty to go to their departmental web pages for further contact information.

  • Gevirtz Graduate School of Education

teaching of writing, writing in the disciplines, history of literacy genre theory, activity theory, genre theory

  • Department of Linguistics

sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, language and gender, African American English discourse

  • Department of Linguistics

psycholinguistics, child language, discourse, Japanese and Korean linguistics

  • Gevirtz Graduate School of Education

Sociology of Education, sociolinguistics and literacy, gender socialization

  • Department of Linguistics

linguistic anthropology, interactional linguistics, stance, dialogic syntax, spoken corpus construction / English corpus linguistics, Mayan linguistics

  • Professor Emeritus
  • Department of Anthropology
  • UC Berkeley

Sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, urban anthropology, discourse analysis; India, Northwestern Europe, U.S.

  • Gevirtz Graduate School of Education

language and communicative development, gender differences in langauge and cognition, language Socialization, cognitive science

  • Department of Sociology

conversation analysis, social aspects of grammar, social life of very young children

  • Visiting Faculty/Researcher

Graduate school of Language, Communication, & Culture,
Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan

  • Gevirtz Graduate School of Education

trusting relations, social differences, learning, education, cognitive science

  • Department of Sociology

the organization of talk in interaction, sociology of science and technology, sociology of mass communication

  • Department of Linguistics

interactional linguistics, emergent grammar, interaction and grammar

  • Department of Sociology

conversation analysis, ethnomethodology, interaction and social structure

  • Department of Sociology

conversation analysis, emergency calls to the police, social life of very young children, talk and identity

LISO Alumni

David Fearon

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2005)

Jennifer Garland

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2008)

Lead Annotator, Linguistic Data Consortium, University of Pennsylvania

garjen@ldc.upenn.edu

Annette Harrison

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2008)

Sarah Jones

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2004)

Survey Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research

SJones@mathematica-mpr.com

Dissertation

Studying "success" at an "effective" school : How a nationally recognized public school overcomes racial, ethnic and social boundaries and creates a culture of success.

Research Interests

My current research is on the culture of effective schools. I am also interested in the relationship between self-concept, ethnic and racial identity development, and effective schools.

Agnes Kang

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2000)

Assistant Professor - Department of English, University of Hong Kong

makang@hkucc.hku.hk

Dissertation

Talk, interaction and cultural persistence Constituting Korean American discourse in a meeting contex.

Research Interests

My research interests center around the discursive construction of Asian diasporic and Asian American identities. My current research examines language and society in the context of the Korean community in Hong Kong.

Piljoo Kang

(Ph.D. Education, 2009)

Elise Kärkkäinen

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 1998)

University Lecturer - Department of English, University of Oulu, Finland

Elise.Karkkainen@oulu.fi

Dissertation

The marking and interactional functions of epistemic stance in American English conversational discourse.

Research Interests

My current research still evolves around stance and more specifically stance taking as a dialogic, interactive, and intersubjective activity. The above research project is carried out in collaboration with John Du Bois, whose idea of stance as enacted in the public space of dialogic interaction has greatly inspired our work. We aim to add to the range of linguistic and interactional resources that can be used by participants in talk-in-interaction for taking stances. Our data consist of the Santa Barbara Corpus of Spoken American English, recordings of everyday British English speech, a collection of American and British news interviews, and Finnish everyday conversations.

Kobin Kendrick

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2010)

Research Project Coordinator, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Kobin.Kendrick@mpi.nl

Mardi Kidwell

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2003)

Associate Professor - Department of Communication, University of New Hampshire

mkidwell@unh.edu

Dissertation

“Looking to see if someone is looking at you”: Gaze and the organization of observability in very young children's harassing acts toward a peer.

Research Interests

Child-adult interactions

Police-citizen interactions

Gaze and embodied action in interaction

Satoko Kobayashi

(Ph.D. Education, 2008)

S. Bahar Koymen

(Ph.D. Education, 2011)

Jung-Eun Janie Lee

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2010)

Assistant Professor, Department of English, Linguistics, and Communication, University of Mary Washington

jlee8@umw.edu

Larry Linton

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2006)

Carlos Nash

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2011)

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Kansas

cmnash@ku.edu

Eva Oxelson

(Ph.D., Education, 2011)

Joseph Sung-Yul Park

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2004)

Associate Professor - Department of English Language and Literature, National University of Singapore

ellpjs@nus.edu.sg

Dissertation

Globalization, language, and social order: Ideologies of English in South Korea.

Research Interests

Interaction and language ideology

Prosody in conversation

English and globalization

Marcia Rech

(Ph.D. Education, 1998)

Deborah Perry Romero

(Ph.D Education, 2003)

Professor - Modern Languages-English, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Mexico

dromero@uaq.mx

Dissertation

The social accomplishment of literacy. Latino families appropriation of technology in an after-school setting.

Research Interests

Her research focuses on interdisciplinary areas of language, literacy and bilingualism. Specifically, she draws on sociocultural and constructivist perspectives to study communication and interaction in joint mediated activity, through discourse and conversation analyses. She has studied the development of writing and literacy in bilingual contexts both in Mexico and with Latino immigrants in US. Her current research explores the interaction between gesture and language in technology settings.

Elena Skapoulli

(Ph.D. Education, 2005)

Michaele Smith

(Ph.D. Education, 1999)

Peggy Szymanski

(Ph.D. Spanish & Portuguese, 1996)

Senior Research Scientist at Xerox Innovation Group

peggy.szymanski@xerox.com

Dissertation

Organizing Talk in Activity: Spanish/English Bilingual Speakers in Classroom Work Groups.

Research Interests

Learning activity

The organization of multi-party talk-in-interaction and remote continuing states of incipient talk

Culture change across organizations

Tomoyo Takagi

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2001)

Seyda Tarim

(Ph.D. Education, 2011)

Monica Turk

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2006)

Michele Wakin

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2005)

Kevin Whitehead

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2010)

Lecturer, Department of Psychology, the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

LISO Experience Page

Read what alumni say about LISO:

Sarah Jones

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2004)

“LISO was a tremendous help in developing analytic skills and seeing data from different perspectivest. It was also a great place to share work and receive valuable feedback.”

Joseph Sung-Yul Park

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2004)

“I learned very much form the interdisciplinary dialogue of the LISO group. The combined perspectives of functional linguistics, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, and linguistic anthropology helped me develop a critical and detail-oriented perspective on language, and encouraged me to pursue issues that are not constrained by one traditional discipline.”

Mardi Kidwell

(Ph.D. Sociology, 2003)

“I was a member of LISO from my first year as a graduate student and it gave me the chance to focus my scholarship early on. The group always provided a supportive arena for me to present my work and get feedback. LISO's strength, I think, is the commitment of the people who make up the group to rigorous and thoughtful scholarship. I've missed the discussions and great people!”

Deborah Perry Romero

(Ph.D Education, 2003)

“LISO was definitely one of my best experiences at UCSB! It constituted a unique interdisciplinary space that allowed for engagement and exchange of ideas and concepts, usually grounded in research-based data, amongst faculty, students and guest speakers, all of who shared a common interest in language and social interaction.

As a scholar of language working within the Education Department, LISO provided me with unique opportunities to discover and partake in intellectual discussions on a range of linguistic based topics from Sociology, Linguistics, Anthropology, Psychology and, of course, Education. Nowhere on campus (except perhaps at the UCEN!) did such a diverse group come together. The atmosphere was always collegial and supportive, and encouraged graduate students to share and present their developing research and opinions too.

LISO’s connections with CLIC, at UCLA, also provided exposure to a still broader network of graduate students and professionals studying language and interaction across diverse settings. The yearly, graduate student organized, conferences were without doubt academic (and social) events not to be missed.

I would strongly recommend anyone with an interest in understanding language, its organization and role in human interactions to consider LISO as emphasis for strengthening their graduate learning experience while at UCSB.”

Agnes Kang

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 2000)

“LISO is a unique group of active and energetic scholars who enjoy exchanging ideas and helping each other to further develop research on language, interaction, and social organization. The interdisciplinary nature of the group offers multiple insights and perspectives, and the 'tolerance' of researchers who are willing to stretch and learn from other disciplines is a rare quality not found in many places.”

Elise Kärkkäinen

(Ph.D. Linguistics, 1998)

“In the early 90’s when I was a graduate student at UCSB there was already some cooperation between Linguistics, Sociology and Education. My dissertation work benefited greatly from a chance to learn about conversation analysis by auditing courses, attending data sessions, and taking part in some joint seminars, and I think it is an excellent idea that students can now have this interdisciplinary Ph.D. emphasis as a more established part of their studies. In recent years I have had a research project that involves four researchers here in Finland (please see http://www.ekl.oulu.fi/stance/), two of whom (Pentti Haddington and Tiina Keisanen) have actually attended some LISO courses. This wonderful opportunity has been of great importance to our work here..”

Peggy Szymanski

(Ph.D. Spanish & Portugese, 1996)

"LISO was valuable because I could explore interdisciplinary research interests within a formal academic program without having to do an individualized Ph.D. My LISO background helped me secure my present position, because it packages my qualifications (Spanish Linguistics, educational research and conversation analysis) in a comprehensible and desirable way. And the way of working that I learned from being a LISO member has been crucial to my success at PARC, as I am able to effectively collaborate with the diverse members of my group (anthropologists, cognitive psychologists, sociologists) as well as the computer scientists and other technologists at the center."

LISO Scholars

LISO Scholars are visiting scholars from other universities around the world who conduct research on issues related to social interaction. LISO Scholars are recognized on the LISO website and are invited to attend and participate in regular meetings and special events hosted by LISO. The LISO Scholars Program is unable to provide any financial or other resources; visiting scholars must have their own funding.

LISO Scholars must be affiliated with one of the four contributing LISO departments (Communication, Education, Linguistics, and Sociology). Prospective visiting scholars should apply directly to the department most relevant to their research area and should indicate in their application their interest in being selected as a LISO Scholar. Graduate students, faculty members, and professional research scientists are all eligible to be named as LISO Scholars. LISO Scholars’ visits may begin and end at any time and may be of any length agreed upon by the sponsoring department. 

2012 – 13

Ikuto Morimoto - ikuyom@kwansei.ac.jp

 

2011 – 2012

 

2010 – 2011

Rosalia Dutra -  rosalia@unt.edu

 

2009 – 2010

Rosalia Dutra -  rosalia@unt.edu

Ryoko Suzuki - ryoko@hc.cc.keio.ac.jp

 

2008 & Before

Jessica A. Hobson  - j.hobson@ich.ucl.ac.uk

R. Peter Hobson  - r.hobson@ich.ucl.ac.uk

Sarah King  - sarah.king@students.unibe.ch

Geertje Van Bergen  - g.vanbergen@let.ru.nl