Crystal Bae (Geography, UCSB) & Matthew Fritzler (Sociology, UCSB)

Event Date: 

Friday, April 27, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm

Event Location: 

  • Education 1205

Soc 236 Student Data Sessions:

“Collaborative Route Planning and Situated Navigation in a New Environment”
Crystal Bae (UCSB Geography)
 
“Policing the Secondary Gains of the Victim Category”
Matthew Fritzler (UCSB Sociology)
 

“Collaborative Route Planning and Situated Navigation in a New Environment”
Crystal Bae (UCSB Geography)
 
This study investigates both route planning and situated navigation by pairs of people (dyads) in a wayfinding task in an unfamiliar environment. Participants collaborated on a task to both plan and execute a route between a given origin and destination point. Each dyad was video-recorded by the researcher during both the planning and navigation phases. Using this rich repository of video-recorded interaction of participants’ navigational planning and execution, I investigate strategies of social role-taking (such as leading and following), the use of environmental cues and references, and uncertainty in wayfinding.
 
In this talk, I will share preliminary recordings from my study and invite additional feedback on further analysis and next steps. In the planning phase of this study, each dyad was given start and end points between which they had to devise and agree upon a route to take. Each dyad was then taken to the study site where they navigated together between those same start and end points, while being video-recorded and GPS-tracked. From coded interactions of these route planning interactions, I explore potential explanations for successful collaborative route planning and several contributors to uncertainty in the planning phases of navigation. This research agenda furthers our understanding of collaboration during navigation, and additionally illuminates the impact of social roles on decision-making and interaction in a wayfinding task.
 
“Policing the Secondary Gains of the Victim Category”
Matthew Fritzler (UCSB Sociology) 
 
I am analyzing interactions around the victim category to determine how online users police the boundaries to the category and its associated secondary gains. I use the Youtube comments section of Taylor Swift’s “Look What You Made Me Do” as a cite of analysis. Out of the total comments section, I have identified the 126 interactive threads that mention the term “victim” in the parent comment. Using these data I investigate how participants police the victim category and its secondary gains.
 
Preliminary findings suggest that participants orient towards the secondary gains of the victim category rather than the category themselves. Those who reject these gains appear to do so by either ascribing the proposed victim to a different mutually exclusive category or judging the proposed victim as deficient in some attribute required for victimhood. In this talk I hope to garner feedback regarding how these rejections are refuted.